COURSE CATALOG

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SSE #207: Dehydration and Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage: Implications for Recovery

Dehydration (>2% reduction in body mass) can result in decreased performance and delayed recovery.  Although it has not been largely studied, there is limited evidence that suggests that dehydration may exacerbate exercise induced muscle damage (EIMD) and prolong recovery.  The proposed mechanisms for the adverse effects of dehydration on EIMD include alterations in cell volume and ion flux, cell membrane disruption, impaired excitation-contraction coupling, decreased skeletal blood flow, modified red blood cell properties, and/or intensification of maladaptive signaling.   

Reference Article

SSE #207: Dehydration and Exercise-Induced Muscle Damage: Implications for Recovery

Course Objectives

  • Utilize the information presented in this SSE to create an informed opinion on the role of dehydration has on EIMD. 
  • Describe the effects of hyperthermia has on skeletal muscles and the influence hyperthermia has on EIMD.
  • Discuss the presented mechanisms of the adverse effects of dehydration on EIMD and how it negatively affects performance. 

 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2022

BOC

1

01/01/2022

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

10/21/2023

Reference Article

https://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/sse-docs/king-baker_sse_207_a05.pdf?sfvrsn=2

SSE #206: Nutritional factors that affect fat oxidation rates during exercise

During exercise, both fat and carbohydrate are metabolized to produce energy.  At lower intensities and rest, fat is the predominate substrate that is metabolized.  As intensity increases, carbohydrate metabolism increases and fat metabolism decreases.  Incremental exercise tests have been developed on both a cycle ergometer and treadmill to measure the maximal fat oxidation (MFO) and at what intensity MFO occurs (FATMAX).  It has been shown that there is large individual variation in MFO and FATMAX, and that individuals may have a unique FATMAX curve.  Increasing an athlete’s fat oxidation may be beneficial as it could preserve the limited amount of muscle and liver glycogen, which could then delay fatigue.  Several nutritional supplements thought to increase fat oxidation have been studied, such as; green tea, New Zealand blackcurrants, caffeine, and Omega-3.  In addition to supplementation, training strategies to decrease muscle and liver glycogen availability prior to exercise have been shown to increase fat oxidation during exercise.  It is important to note that an increase in fat oxidation during exercise has not been associated with improved performance.

Reference Article

SSE #206: Nutritional factors that affect fat oxidation rates during exercise

Course Objectives

  •  Utilize the information presented in this SSE and discuss the different supplements that may increase fat oxidation.
  • Describe Maximal Fat Oxidation and FATMAX and how ingesting carbohydrate may affect the fat oxidation curve.
  • Discuss the various strategies to decrease muscle and liver glycogen availability and how it may lead to an increase in fat oxidation.

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2022

BOC

1

01/01/2022

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

10/21/2023

Reference Article

https://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/sse-docs/randell-spriet_sse_206_a03.pdf?sfvrsn=2

SSE #204: Blood biomarker analysis for the high-performance athlete

Understanding an athlete’s blood biomarkers is an objective way to measure performance, recovery, and nutritional status.  Since an athlete is exposed to different stressors such as increased workload, sleep loss, and travel, it is important to monitor an athlete’s blood biomarkers to prevent injury and illness.  Common issues that can be found my measuring blood biomarkers is low Vitamin D and Iron status, low energy availability, and decreased hormone levels.  Analyzing blood biomarkers can help to keep an athlete healthy, however, the results can be jeopardized by faulty pre analytic approaches.  Ensuring appropriate pre analytic approaches are taken are likely to increase the probability of measuring physiological changes in an athlete.  In addition to blood biomarkers, other subjective, physical, and metabolic measurements should be taken to measure physiological changes during an athlete’s season.   

 

Reference Article

SSE #204: Blood biomarker analysis for the high-performance athlete

Course Objectives

  • Utilize the presented information to determine if measuring your athlete’s blood biomarkers is advantageous to their training plan.
  • Describe the proper pre analytic approaches and how to implement the necessary steps to collect the most valid data. 
  • Discuss the benefits of longitudinal data collection for your athlete’s health and performance. 
 

 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2022

BOC

1

01/01/2022

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

10/08/2023

Reference Article

https://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/sse-docs/pedlar_sse_204_a03.pdf?sfvrsn=2

SSE #203: Caffeine and Exercise Performance: an update

Caffeine is one of the most studied supplements and has shown ergogenic effects in almost every sport scenario it has been studied.  The benefits of ingesting moderate to high doses of caffeine (5-9 mg/kg of body mass) before and during exercise have been well established in endurance exercise.  Although the moderate to high doses of caffeine improves endurance performance, side effects such as gastrointestinal upset, nervousness, mental confusion, inability to focus and disturbed sleep have been reported.  Lower doses of caffeine (<3 mg/kg of body mass) have been shown to have similar performance benefits as the moderate to high doses, and without the side effects.  In addition to endurance performance, caffeine also improves performance in stop-and-go and team sports that require short-term, high intensity movements.  Caffeine seems to have an antagonistic interaction with adenosine receptors in the central and peripheral nervous system, which increases central drive and reduces the perception of fatigue and pain during exercise.  There is some variation between individuals in response to the effects of caffeine and it is unclear whether genetic polymorphisms can explain the inter-individual seen during caffeine administration. 

Reference Article

SSE #203: Caffeine and Exercise Performance: an update

Course Objectives

  • Utilize the available information on caffeine supplementation and exercise when considering adding caffeine into your athlete’s nutrition plan. 
  • Describe the mechanisms that caffeine effects the central and/or peripheral nervous system and how it improves exercise.
  • Discuss the possible genetic differences of individuals who do not respond or have very little responses to caffeine.   

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2022

BOC

1

01/01/2022

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

10/08/2023

Reference Article

https://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/sse-docs/spriet_sse_203_a03_final.pdf?sfvrsn=2

SSE #201: Nutrition and Athlete Bone Health

Bone health is an important aspect that the general population should pay attention to, especially the athlete population.  Good bone health will not only prevent immediate injuries such as stress fractures but will prevent long lasting damage later in an athlete’s life such as osteoporosis.  Even though athletes need to pay special attention to their bone health, the general recommendations to support bone health is not very different from the general population and it is not clear whether the recommendations for the general population will adequately support an athlete’s needs through periods of intense training.  Athletes should consider consuming additional supplements if their food preferences or intolerances do not allow them to get sufficient nutrients needed to support their bone health.  Athletes also need to be aware of their energy intake and expenditure to ensure they are maintaining a positive energy balance. 

Reference Article

SSE #201: Nutrition and Athlete Bone Health

Course Objectives

  • Utilize the provided key nutrients for bone health to apply the practical applications to ensure your athlete receives the nutrients needed to support their bone health. 
  • Describe the relationship between energy intake and energy expenditure and how they contribute to energy balance. 
  • Discuss other nutrient issues that are specific to athletes and how they can negatively impact an athlete’s overall health and bone health. 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2022

BOC

1

01/01/2022

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

10/07/2023

Reference Article

https://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/sse-docs/sale_sse_201_a05_final.pdf?sfvrsn=2

SSE #199: Nutrition Recommendations for Altitude Training

High altitude training camps are commonly used by endurance athletes in order to increase their fitness prior to competition.   Energy availability (EA) requirements may be altered by low to moderate altitudes, and it is suggested that EA may play a role in an athlete’s ability to adjusts to hypoxic conditions.  Iron is a micronutrient with known importance to an athlete’s health while at altitude and is important for increasing hemoglobin mass.  While studies investigating physiological adaptations at extreme altitudes (>3,000 m.) have been conducted, there is a call for more studies at low to moderate altitudes (1,600-2,400 m.).  Since the effects of training at low to moderate altitudes are not yet fully confirmed, it is best to apply sea-level nutrition and hydration guidelines to an athlete’s training at altitude. 

Reference Article

SSE #199: Nutrition Recommendations for Altitude Training

Course Objectives

  • Utilize the monitoring and nutritional recommendations from this SSE during an athlete’s high-altitude training. 
  • Discuss the initial hypoxic effects an athlete may experience and how to best prevent or alleviate the negative symptoms. 
  • Define energy availability and describe how an athlete’s energy needs may change while training at altitude.  

 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2022

BOC

1

01/01/2022

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

10/07/2023

Reference Article

https://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/sse-docs/sse_altitudenutritionarticle_v3.pdf?sfvrsn=2

Monitoring Training Load and Recovery in Collegiate Athletes

Athlete monitoring is one of the key foundational pieces of any training program to ensure athletes are ready to compete at the highest level. In this presentation, Eric Freese, PhD, and Principal Scientist at the Gatorade Sports Science Institute shares what he believes to be the good and the bad of athlete monitoring, breaks down the theoretical principles of athlete monitoring and shares the current understanding of it, and shares some of the latest findings in football athletes.  

Reference Article

Monitoring Training Load and Recovery in Collegiate Athletes

Course Objectives

  • Identify the principles of athlete monitoring 
  • Describe how internal and  external load affect an athlete’s performance 
  • Discuss the basics of how to implement an impactful athlete monitoring program 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

0.5

01/01/2022

BOC

0.5

01/01/2022

Reference Article

http://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/educational-materials/webinar-handouts/handout-load-monitoring-eric-freese_a04.pdf?sfvrsn=2

Hydration: Application & Innovation

This session, developed by the team at Performance 365 in partnership with the Gatorade Sports Science Institute and presented by Sports Dietitian Jen Ketterly, provides an overview on hydration strategies and explores the applications and factors impacting intake that have been affected by COVID-19.  

Course Objectives

  • Provide fluid recommendations for athletes 
  • Educate athletes and provide effective strategies for acclimatization
  • Assess athlete fluid status
  • Describe the factors that impact intake  
 

 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

0.5

01/20/2023

BOC

0.5

01/20/2023

Hygiene & Food Safety Considerations for Return to Play

This session, developed by the team at Performance 365 in partnership with the Gatorade Sports Science Institute shares hygiene and food safety considerations for athletes and sports performance professionals to take into account to ensure safe return to play in the current environment. Sports Dietitian Leslie Bonci discusses best practices for on-the-field hydration, at-home and away fueling, travel guidelines and more.  

Course Objectives

  • Review the critical components of a hazard analysis and the application to the sports environment 
  • Develop protocols to safeguard health and identify best practices to comply with COVID-19 recommended guidelines 
  • Develop food safety recommendations for athletes and their support staff/family 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

0.5

01/01/2022

BOC

0.5

01/01/2022

Nutrition and Immune Health: Considerations for Athletes

This session, developed by the team at Performance 365 in partnership with the Gatorade Sports Science Institute provides an overview of the immune system. Throughout the session, Sports Dietitian Roberta Anding discusses key nutrition education concepts to best promote health and immune function, such as nutrients and lifestyle factors, to help sports health professionals keep their athletes educated and healthy as they return to play.

Course Objectives

1. Outline functions of the immune system

2. Discuss dietary constituents needed for immune support

3. Describe lifestyle factors associated with immune health

4. Review key nutrition education concepts to best promote health and immune function

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

0.75

01/01/2022

BOC

0.75

01/01/2022

Creatine: What Sports Health Practitioners Need to Know

Creatine supplementation has been considered a potential aid to athletic training and performance. This session will provide a review of the existing research surrounding creatine and scientific support for its use in athletic performance, adaptation and resistance training. The session will summarize its history, the effects of supplementation use on muscle creatine, brain metabolism and cognitive processing. Eric Rawson, Ph.D, FACSM, CSCS will also provide safe, practical uses for creatine and debunking its associated myths.  

 

Reference Article

Creatine: What Sports Health Practitioners Need to Know

Course Objectives

  • Describe the history of creatine research 
  • Explain the effects of creatine supplementation on muscle creatine, exercise performance, and adaptation to resistance training 
  • Describe the potential mechanisms that explain the performance enhancing effect of creatine supplementation 
  • Explain the safety of creatine supplementation as it relates to renal and muscle dysfunction 
  • Describe the effects of creatine supplementation on brain metabolism and cognitive processing 
  • Describe the potential benefits of creatine supplementation on mild traumatic brain injury 
  • Identify the myths associated with creatine supplementation 

 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

06/30/2023

BOC

1

06/30/2023

NSCA

0.2

06/30/2023

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

06/30/2023

Reference Article

http://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/educational-materials/webinar-handouts/rawson_reference_list_a02.pdf?sfvrsn=2

Indian Spices and Health

Indian spices have been historically regarded as powerful health aids, but scientists have begun researching specific effects only recently. This session will provide a review of scientific support for various Indian spices and their effects on health. The session will provide an understanding of each Indian spice, including its origin and proposed uses. In this session, Sports Dietitian Susan Kundrat will also summarize recent scientific evidence related to health benefits and outline practical applications and recommendations for the use of Indian spices, specifically turmeric, ginger, fenugreek, and cinnamon. 

 

Reference Article

Indian Spices and Health

Course Objectives

  • Explain origin and proposed uses for Indian spices, particularly turmeric, ginger, fenugreek, and cinnamon 
  • Describe at least one potential benefit areas from current research findings for each Indian spice, specifically turmeric, ginger, fenugreek, and cinnamon 
  • Identify potential practical usage opportunities and consumption recommendations for Indian spices and be able to articulate the applicable populations and limitations that currently exist for each 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/20/2023

BOC

1

01/20/2023

Reference Article

http://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/educational-materials/webinar-handouts/handout-indian-spices-and-health-susan-kundra_a06.pdf?sfvrsn=2

Functional Fruits and Exercise: Cherries and Berries

Many fruits have been postulated as potential aids to athletic performance. This session will provide an understanding of current scientific support for various functional fruits, including cherries and berries, and their efficacy in sport. The session will outline the approach to literature review, provide an overview of polyphenols and anthocyanins, and summarize current research surrounding functional fruits, specifically tart cherry, blackcurrant, and pomegranate. In this session, Ryan Nuccio, MS, RD will also provide practical applications of research findings related to form, amount, and occasion of functional fruit for optimal benefit athletes. 

Reference Article

Functional Fruits and Exercise: Cherries and Berries

Course Objectives

  • Describe the potential benefit areas (i.e., outcome measures) for functional fruits; particularly for tart cherry, blackcurrant, and pomegranate 
  • Explain some of the potential confounders and why some studies may not have revealed significant benefits while others did for the same outcome measure 
  • Identify potential practical usage opportunities for functional fruits and be able to articulate the main advantages/limitations that currently exist for each 

 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/20/2023

BOC

1

01/20/2023

Reference Article

http://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/educational-materials/webinar-handouts/handout-cherries-and-berries-ryan-nuccio_a07.pdf?sfvrsn=2

SSE #198: Nutrition and athlete immune health: a new perspective

Sickness absence from training is incompatible with success in elite sport, which demands a consistently high training volume, i.e. the less sick, the more an athlete can train. Nutrient availability influences immunity because macro and micronutrients are involved in a multitude of immune processes. Macronutrients are involved in immune cell metabolism and protein synthesis and micronutrients are involved in antioxidant defenses. A new paradigm for exercise immunology is presented that considers resistance (the strength of the immune weaponry) and tolerance (the ability to endure microbes and dampen defense activity). This new paradigm of resistance and tolerance helps to explain why nutritional supplements with tolerogenic effects (e.g., probiotics, vitamin C and vitamin D) are the new targets, as these may reduce the infection burden in athletes.

Reference Article

SSE #198: Nutrition and athlete immune health: a new perspective

Course Objectives

  • Utilize this information to implement a strategy to improve your athlete’s immunity. 
  • Discuss the resistance and tolerance paradigms to plan how to keep your athlete healthy during increased training periods and travel.
  • Describe how tolerogenic supplements such as Vitamin C, Vitamin D, and probiotics may improve the body’s immunity.

 

 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2022

BOC

1

01/01/2022

NSCA

0.1

12/31/2021

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

05/28/2023

Reference Article

https://www.gssiweb.org/en/sports-science-exchange/Article/nutrition-and-athlete-immune-health-a-new-perspective

SSE #196: New ideas about hydration and its impact on the athlete's brain, heart and muscles

Dehydration is known to impair physical performance.  Additionally, dehydration and hyperthermia take a toll on other systems and organs of the body such as the cardiovascular and musculoskeletal systems and the brain.  Dehydration is influenced by environmental conditions as well as the athlete’s training status, thus influencing an athlete’s core temperature The impact of dehydration varies among individuals and depends upon factors such as training status, intensity of exercise, environmental conditions and acclimatization status.  Hydrating during training or competition by consuming fluids is the best way to prevent or alleviate the effects of dehydration on performance. 

Reference Article

SSE #196: New ideas about hydration and its impact on the athlete's brain, heart and muscles

Course Objectives

  • Utilize the information to apply a hydration strategy to your personal or your athlete’s training or competition strategy.   
  • Describe the effects that dehydration and hyperthermia have on submaximal and maximal endurance capacity in varying environmental conditions. 
  • Discuss the systems that are negatively affected by dehydration and hyperthermia and how those systems influence each other when dehydrated. 

 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2022

BOC

1

01/01/2022

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

09/11/2023

Reference Article

https://www.gssiweb.org/en/sports-science-exchange/Article/new-ideas-about-hydration-and-its-impact-on-the-athlete-s-brain-heart-and-muscles

SSE #195: Fruit derived polyphenol supplementation for performance and recovery

The mechanism of how polyphenol supplementation affects performance is complex and not fully understood.  Polyphenols are derived from fruits and vegetables and are associated with color and taste.  Approximately 90% of polyphenols are not absorbed in the small intestine, thus they are subsequently made available by colon gut bacteria in the source of phenolic acids.  The phenolic acids are then able to be absorbed.  Beneficial effects of polyphenol supplementation may include improved endurance, repeated sprint performance, and faster recovery of muscle strength however, only a small number of studies have been conducted to date and more research is needed to understand the ergogenic potential of polyphenol supplementation. 

Reference Article

SSE #195: Fruit derived polyphenol supplementation for performance and recovery

Course Objectives

  • Utilize the evidence behind the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and vasoactive properties of polyphenol supplementation to improve exercise performance and muscle recovery in athletes.
  • Discuss the amounts and timing of polyphenol supplementation needed to improve exercise performance and muscle recovery in different trained populations.
  • Describe the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant mechanisms and pathways of polyphenol supplementation.

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2022

BOC

1

01/01/2022

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

08/25/2023

Reference Article

https://www.gssiweb.org/en/sports-science-exchange/Article/fruit-derived-polyphenol-supplementation-for-performance-and-recovery

Sleep tactics for better athlete health and performance

Optimal sleep is critical for health and is considered one of the most potent performance enhancers available. During sleep, many processes take place including repairing and rebuilding muscle, enhancing immune function, and the pruning and forming of new memories. For an athlete, sub-optimal sleep can lead to impaired mood, shorter time to exhaustion, poor nutrition choices, and greater injury risk. Sleep Scientist Amy Bender, MS, PhD will discuss the role of the athletic trainer and sports health practitioners to ensure athletes get sufficient quantity, quality and timing of sleep – so athletes can perform better on and off the field. 

Presentation Handout

PDF Sheet

Course Objectives

  • Define what constitutes good sleep including optimal sleep quantity, quality, and timing of sleep. 
  • Dispel sleep myths for yourself and translate that knowledge into sleep education for your athletes in a meaningful way 
  • Implement sleep screening strategies and identification of maladaptive sleep behaviors such in the athletes you are working with 
  • Implement other sleep strategies including “banking sleep” and napping  
 

 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2022

BOC

1

12/31/2021

NSCA

0.2

12/31/2021

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

05/31/2023

Presentation Handout

PDF Sheet

Evidence for the benefit of dietary supplements for team sport athletes

Nutritional supplements are a multi-billion-dollar industry but what is the proof any of them benefit health or performance?  The majority of studies involving the relationship between supplements and athletic performance have been carried out utilizing an endurance-exercise model.  Although, most team sports have an aerobic component, they are characterized by bursts of high-intensity activity requiring power, speed, and quick decision-making.  All athletes are looking for an “edge” and professionals working with athletes are charged with improving performance while keeping them safe.  Sports Dietitian Kris Osterberg, PhD, RD, CSSD reviews the evidence supporting the food components and nutritional supplements that have been shown to improve some aspect of team-sport performance. 

 

Presentation Handout

PDF Sheet

Course Objectives

  • Compile and summarize the research supporting the role of the supplement in improving performance. 
  • Identify the potential mechanism(s) of action by which the supplement enhances function. 
  • List at least 3 food / supplement sources for each supplement discussed, as well as efficacious dosages. 

 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2022

BOC

1

12/31/2021

NSCA

0.2

12/31/2021

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

05/31/2023

Presentation Handout

PDF Sheet

SSE #188: Vegetarian and vegan diets for athletic training and performance

Vegetarian diets are selected by athletes for a variety of reasons including health, environmental, ethical, philosophical, religious/spiritual and esthetics. Athletes at all levels, from youth to recreational to elite, can meet their energy and nutrient needs on a vegetarian or vegan diet that contains a variety of foods, including grain products, fruits, vegetables, protein-rich plant foods, and (if desired) dairy products and eggs. Like most athletes, vegetarian and vegan athletes may benefit from education about food choices to optimize their health and performance. 

Reference Article

SSE #188: Vegetarian and vegan diets for athletic training and performance

Course Objectives

  • Utilize nutrition strategies to ensure vegetarian and vegan athletes are meeting their energy, macronutrient and micronutrient needs to support health and performance.  
  • Discuss the various types of vegetarian and vegan diets and benefits or limitations of each  
  • Describe the potential health and performance benefits of vegetarian and vegan diets 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2022

BOC

1

01/01/2022

NSCA

0.1

12/31/2021

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

04/17/2023

CSCCa

1

12/31/2021

Reference Article

https://www.gssiweb.org/en/sports-science-exchange/Article/vegetarian-and-vegan-diets-for-athletic-training-and-performance

SSE #179: NUTRITION STRATEGIES FOR GUT HEALTH AND IMMUNE FUNCTION - WHAT DO WE KNOW AND WHAT ARE THE GAPS?

Gut health and immune function are central to preventing illnesses that negatively impact athletic performance. More recently, evidence suggests that gut health and immune function may play a role in promoting adaptation to exercise. Gut bacteria, or the microbiota, perform several vital functions. Athletes are advised to work with their dietitians to determine what may be useful to add or remove from their diet. 

Reference Article

SSE #179: NUTRITION STRATEGIES FOR GUT HEALTH AND IMMUNE FUNCTION - WHAT DO WE KNOW AND WHAT ARE THE GAPS?

Course Objectives

  • Utilize dietary interventions to promote gut health 

  • Discuss where the science is and where further research is warranted 
  • Describe the relationship between the gut and athlete health/performance 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

01/01/2023

BOC

1

01/01/2023

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

01/01/2023

Reference Article

https://www.gssiweb.org/en/sports-science-exchange/Article/nutrition-strategies-for-gut-health-and-immune-function---what-do-we-know-and-what-are-the-gaps

Hydration: One Size Does Not Fit All

Hydration for sport is more than a health and safety concern during warm weather. Suboptimal hydration can also cause decreased performance in a variety of sports and environmental conditions. By identifying individuals’ fluid needs and developing replacement plans around those needs and the constraints of a given sport or activity, athletic trainers can improve their athletes’ performance. This session will provide athletic trainers the tools to design better hydration plans through evidence-based practices for the assessment of fluid needs and consult with a variety of physically active individuals beyond one size fits all advice.

Reference Article

Hydration: One Size Does Not Fit All

Course Objectives

  • Identify current paradigms for the assessment of fluid needs for the physically active
  • Compare and contrast different fluid replacement strategies for optimizing performance

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

06/30/2022

BOC

1

06/30/2022

NSCA

0.2

06/30/2022

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

06/30/2022

Reference Article

http://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/educational-materials/webinar-handouts/gssi-2020-cdr-references_a02.pdf?sfvrsn=2

Managing Post-Exercise Inflammation: From Ibuprofen to Cherries

Most people know NSAIDs, like aspirin, can help control inflammation in the body – but what if the same results could be achieved through nutrition? Sports dietitian, Roberta Anding, MS, RD/LD, CDE, CSSD, FAND, sheds some light on the benefits of an anti-inflammatory diet to reduce the inflammation associated with exercise.

Course Objectives

  • Summarize the physiological difference between chronic and acute inflammation as it relates to exercise, and how anti-inflammatory compounds combat inflammation.
  • Translate data and evidence-based research into informed recommendations on how to incorporate anti-inflammatory nutrients into athletes’ diets.
  • List at least five dietary sources of anti-inflammatory foods and their bioactive compounds.

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

12/31/2021

BOC

0.75

12/31/2021