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Methods to Keep the Female Athlete Healthy: From Mental to Physical Health

While there is a disparity in sports performance research on female athletes, several experts in the field are making progress in furthering the understanding of the unique characteristics and needs of this population. From physiological and nutritional needs, to mental health and performance considerations, hear Dr Wendy Borlabi, Dr Trent Stellingwerff, Dr Abbie Smith-Ryan and Dr Sara Oikawa cover methods to keep the female athlete healthy. 

Reference Article

Methods to Keep the Female Athlete Healthy: From Mental to Physical Health

Course Objectives

  • Discuss how low energy availability (LEA) “exposure” does not always lead to Relative Energy Deficiency in Sport (REDs) and elements of the practical application of LEA to optimize health and performance.
  • Understand the initial data and known physiological differences that support evidence-based application for ingredients used by female athletes and discuss the possible implications.
  • Describe sex differences in skeletal muscle morphology and protein metabolism and identify gaps in the scientific literature related to female athlete specific protein research. 

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

2.25

07/29/2025

BOC

2.25

07/29/2025

Commission on Dietetic Registration

2.25

07/29/2025

Reference Article

http://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/educational-materials/webinar-handouts/acsm-2022-pre-con-handouts---all-files.pdf?sfvrsn=2

SSE #206: Nutritional factors that affect fat oxidation rates during exercise

During exercise, both fat and carbohydrate are metabolized to produce energy.  At lower intensities and rest, fat is the predominate substrate that is metabolized.  As intensity increases, carbohydrate metabolism increases and fat metabolism decreases.  Incremental exercise tests have been developed on both a cycle ergometer and treadmill to measure the maximal fat oxidation (MFO) and at what intensity MFO occurs (FATMAX).  It has been shown that there is large individual variation in MFO and FATMAX, and that individuals may have a unique FATMAX curve.  Increasing an athlete’s fat oxidation may be beneficial as it could preserve the limited amount of muscle and liver glycogen, which could then delay fatigue.  Several nutritional supplements thought to increase fat oxidation have been studied, such as; green tea, New Zealand blackcurrants, caffeine, and Omega-3.  In addition to supplementation, training strategies to decrease muscle and liver glycogen availability prior to exercise have been shown to increase fat oxidation during exercise.  It is important to note that an increase in fat oxidation during exercise has not been associated with improved performance.

Reference Article

SSE #206: Nutritional factors that affect fat oxidation rates during exercise

Course Objectives

  •  Utilize the information presented in this SSE and discuss the different supplements that may increase fat oxidation.
  • Describe Maximal Fat Oxidation and FATMAX and how ingesting carbohydrate may affect the fat oxidation curve.
  • Discuss the various strategies to decrease muscle and liver glycogen availability and how it may lead to an increase in fat oxidation.

Course

Credits

Course Expiration

ACSM

1

10/20/2023

BOC

1

10/20/2023

Commission on Dietetic Registration

1

10/20/2023

CSCCa

1

10/20/2023

Reference Article

https://www.gssiweb.org/docs/default-source/sse-docs/randell-spriet_sse_206_a03.pdf?sfvrsn=2