PUBLISHED

January 2017

AUTHOR

Lindsay B. Baker, PhD

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TOPICS

SSE #155

Mark Hargreaves, PhD, FACSM

June 2016

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #151

Michael Gleeson

September 2015

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #149

Romain Meeusen

July 2015

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #135

Shona L. Halson

October 2014

Topics: Athlete Health, Recovery

SSE #112

Exercise, Nutrition and the Brain

Physical activity has been associated with the reduction of a number of physical and mental disorders. There is now ample evidence that physical activity will decrease the incidence of cardiovascular disease, colon and breast cancer and obesity, but also diseases such as Alzheimer’s, depression and anxiety (Gómez-Pinilla, 2011; Van Praag, 2009).

Romain Meeusen, PhD

May 2013

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #95

Collapse in the Endurance Athlete

Collapse is perhaps the most dramatic of all medical problems affecting athletes. Though collapse can be seen in any athletic event requiring maximal exertion, it is most common in endurance events, such as marathons and triathlons. The incidence seems to increase as the race distance, temperature, and humidity increase (OÂ’Conner et al., 2003).

Robert Sallis, MD, FACSM

October 2006

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #89

The Juvenile Obesity Epidemic: Strike Back with Physical Activity

The last three decades have seen a dramatic surge in prevalence of children and adolescent obesity in many developed and underdeveloped countries. Even though the causes of this epidemic are not clear, the reduction in time spent in physical activity and the increase in sedentary pursuits such as TV viewing and computer games are likely contributing factors.

\r\n\r\nProper management of juvenile obesity should include nutritional changes, behavior modification and a physically active lifestyle.

Oded Bar-Or, M.D.

September 2006

Topics: Sports Nutrition, Athlete Health

SSE #85

Exercise, Antioxidants, and Cardioprotection

Exercise, Antioxidants and Cardioprotection Cardiovascular disease is the major cause of death in the United States. Regular exercise and dietary intake of adequate nutritional antioxidants are lifestyle factors that can provide protection against this threat. Dr. Scott Powers's review summarizes our current knowledge regarding the cardioprotective effects of both exercise and dietary antioxidants.

Scott K. Powers, Ph.D., Ed.D.

August 2006

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #82

Optimizing Bone Health: Impact of Nutrition, Exercise, and Hormones

Osteoporosis is a preventable condition, but the fact is that too few Americans (men and women) ingest enough calcium or exercise enough to\r\nprevent it. Everyone should try to maximize peak bone mass by age 30 and attempt to slow the rate of loss afterwards. The latest research on osteoporosis, exercise to maximize peak bone mass, and the role of calcium intake are issues addressed in this article by Dr. Susan Bloomfield

Susan A. Bloomfield, Ph.D.

August 2006

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #81

Anemia And Blood Boosting

Various aspects of anemia and its relation to sport are explored in this article by Dr. Randy Eichner. The use of EPO for blood boosting is also covered. Tips on how to get more iron into the diet and conditions associated with low dietary iron are listed in the supplement.

E. Randy Eichner, M.D.

August 2006

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #77

Nutrition For Child And Adolescent Athletes

Dr. Oded Bar-Or discusses the physiological differences between children, adolescents and adults in this latest article. Protein requirements, fluid and electrolyte requirements and recommendations for optimal nutrition are provided in the article and supplement.

Oded Bar-Or, M.D.

August 2006

Topics: Sports Nutrition, Athlete Health

SSE #74

Screening For Risk Of Cardiac Death In Young Athletes

The sudden cardiac-related death of an athlete during a sports event is a particularly poignant tragedy. Participation in sports--a wholesome pursuit that provides important physical and psychosocial benefits--is not expected to place young, apparently healthy competitors at risk for cardiovascular collapse. When sudden deaths occur in elite-level athletes who have national media exposure, the concerns become magnified. How safe is sports play? What causes these tragic events? How can they be prevented?

Thomas W. Rowland, M.D.

July 2006

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #69

Immunity in Athletes: Current Issues

Publications on the topic of exercise immunology date from late in the 19th century, but it was not until the mid-1980s that a significant number of investigators worldwide devoted their resources to this area of research endeavor. From 1900 to 1997, just under 900 papers on exercise immunology were published, with 75% of these appearing in the 1990s. \r\n\r\n

David C. Nieman, DrPH, FACSM

July 2006

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #67

Anti-Inflamatory Drugs, Kidney Function, and Exercise

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used by competitive athletes and recreational exercisers because of their analgesic (pain reduction) and anti-inflammatory benefits. A list of common NSAIDs and other analgesics available over-the-counter (OTC) is presented in Table 1 (Physicians' Desk Reference, 1997).

Bill Farquhar, M.S. and W. Larry Kenney, Ph.D.

July 2006

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #66

Spinal Cord Injury and Exercise in the Heat

Opportunities to compete in the Para-Olympics, advances in medical treatment and therapies for functional recovery of the disabled, and the recognition that physical activity is beneficial for the health of everyone, abled or disabled, have contributed to increased participation of disabled individuals in regular physical exercise. Like able-bodied athletes, disabled athletes face limitations to performance-fatigue, nutrition and fluid needs, and the possibility of heat exhaustion. In this report, we will discuss thermoregulation and cardiovascular function in the disabled athlete. We will make several recommendations to reduce the chance of heat illness and to delay fatigue in the disabled athlete.\r\n

Maria T.E. Hopman, Ph.D., Rob A. Binkhorst, Ph.D.

July 2006

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #56

Contagious Infections in Competitive Sports

Many athletes believe that physical training enhances immunity and helps prevent upper respiratory tract infection (URTI) like the common cold or \"flu\" (influenza). They also believe that physical activity and fitness help them overcome any minor infections they do get. On the other hand, based largely on anecdotes and on popularization of a link between physical or psychological stress and \"impaired immunity,\" the athletic community in general seems persuaded that intensive training, exhaustive exercise, or competition predisposes athletes to infections.

E. Randy Eichner, M.D.

June 2006

Topics: Athlete Health

SSE #51

Children's Responses to Exercise in Cold Climates: Health Implications

Exercise and climatic heat both induce heat stress. Their synergistic effect, when excessive, may impair physical and cognitive performance, cause hyperthermia, and be detrimental to a child's well-being and health. In contrast, when the body is exposed to a cold environment, exercise-induced thermogenesis will help to prevent excessive body cooling. Therefore, hypothermia (core body temperature of 35o C or less) is more likely to occur during rest than during exercise.

Oded Bar-Or, M.D.

May 2006

Topics: Athlete Health, Hydration & Thermoregulation

SSE #49

Children's Responses to Exercise in Hot Climates: Implications for Performance and Health

Children's physiologic responses to exercise are generally similar to those of adults, but there are several ageand maturation-related differences in their responses. For example, children respond to the combined stresses of exercise and climatic heat differently than do adults (Table 1).\r\n\r\n\r\n

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